Pen And A Sword

Pen And A Sword


My Word!!

Only a mere S separates a word from a sword
One harmless word joined by an S becomes lethal

Written word can

Soothe
Lull
Dull

Hone
Incite
Excite

Elevate
Exhilarate
Energize


Express
Impress
Redress

It can impart a whole gamut of emotions and then some…

A sword on the other hand

Comforts
Defends
Protects

As an Excalibur

Can conquer
Vanquish
Decimate


A soldier’s pride
A matter of honor
And valor


Unsheathed

Makes war
Scares
Kills

Yet it is prompted, lifted, triggered

By a WORD
Penned or spoken or thought

So the pen is mightier than the sword

I rest my case;)

Romancing the WORD

Tantalizing, teasing

Spoken written
Sacred, sacrosanct
Papyrus to paper
Tangible virtual
Powerful, silent,
Gestured by
Eyes, head
Torso, hands
Magic word
Mesmerizing,
Tantalizing
Zinging,
Ringing,
Ranting,
Panting
Orgasmic
Silencing
Suppose
Repose
Elusive
Reclusive
Saint, sinner
Beginning, end
Rent, bend
Sear, smear
Jest, jeer
Leer, peer
Give, take
Circle, veer
In the end
Word
Has the
Last
Word

I romance with words
They rumba in my head
Jealous spouse
Hide my lover word
In eyelids, beckoning
Loving them always
Till death do us part!!

www.binaguptapoetry.com

Logic is like the sword – those who appeal to it, shall perish by it.
Samuel Butler British, Poet

A sword, a spade, and a thought should never be allowed to rust.
James Stephens Irish, Poet

Those who live by the sword get shot by those who don’t. – Anonymous

The sword conquered for a while, but the spirit conquers forever!
Sholem Asch American, Novelist

“Beneath the rule of men entirely great,
The pen is mightier than the sword.”
Edward George Earle Lytton  Bulwer-Lytton (1803–1873)


The Pen is Mightier than the Sword is an ancient Arab proverb. Before Islam united them, Arabs were too often engaged in tribal warfare against each other, so much so that one of their many wars, one that lasted for 40 years, was started between two tribes through a camel owned by one tribe drinking from the other’s water and the fight that ensued thereafter. In those tribal wars the poet of a tribe was highly esteemed and his ability to deride other tribes in his poetry and claim pride for his own was considered the height of might and the poet was given an honor higher than that of the warrior. To this day a traditional dance performed by men in Arabia revolves around the act of men with swords facing each other in battle formation and each is led by a poet, so that’s two poets against each other, and the poets engage in a spontaneous poetry match where one starts with a line of poetry that is repeated by his men in a dance song behind him, and his opponent is required to answer him with a line of poetry that matches it in meter and rhyme – not an easy thing to do – and it continues until one poet is clearly the winner over the other, or, more wisely, until both poets seem to satisfy their men that the issue had been resolved through a display of mutual respect; by that, I mean, that both poets strive to stand to the occasion and show the other that their respective tribes are worthy of respect and won’t be intimidated, while displaying respect for each other.
A poetry line might go “you, your tribe stinks!” – and being such a good line it gets repeated perpetually throughout Arabia to the shame of the derided tribe. Alternatively, it might go “Ma tribe is da bestest!”, and likewise, being a catchy line, gets repeated perpetually throughout Arabia to the pride of the poet’s tribe.
by cscltr

( pictures and some text and references from internet- disclaimer)